Muslims Celebrate Eid In Beacon For End Of Ramadan

Photo Credit: Junior ZayEd

Photo Credit: Junior ZayEd

Junior Zayed pictured with his daughters, who decided to dress up, including scarves, during Ramadan.  Photo Credit: Junior Zayed

Junior Zayed pictured with his daughters, who decided to dress up, including scarves, during Ramadan.
Photo Credit: Junior Zayed

Today was a celebration of the end of Ramadan for Muslims, and the community was celebrating and praying in Beacon. Said one local, Junior Zayed in his Instagram along with this photo pictured above: “We live in one of the most beautiful cities in the world. We would like to thank the City of Beacon Police Department for being here with us while we pray in peace in our place of worship with our families, friends and community.”

More About Eid: Izzy Tells Us

To learn more about Eid, we reached out to A Little Beacon Blog writer Izdihar Dabashi. She explains what Beacon Muslims have been doing today, and why: “Muslims have two Eid holidays: Today is Eid Al-Fitr, which is the first day to break fast following the holy month of Ramadan. Eid Al-Fitr celebrates the completion of Ramadan. We start the day by praying at the mosque for Allah (God) to accept our fast, charity, and good deeds during Ramadan. Each Muslim person donates money to the poor, and it’s common for people to send money to feed the poor or slaughter (in a humane and clean method, which makes it halal) a lamb to feed the poor. Eid is spent with family, some of us go to the park, others to restaurants, some choose to just stay at home and have family over.

“Muslims in Beacon prayed the Eid prayer around 9:30 am today. The Beacon Police actually parked across the street from Masjid Ar-Rashid to keep watch over the mosque. Many of us greatly appreciate their efforts and peaceful involvement in the Muslim community.”

According to Izdihar, if you are passing someone who is recognizing the day, you could say to them: “Eid Mubarak” or even just “Happy Eid.”

More About Ramadan

We invited Izdihar to explain Ramadan in her own words, to help connect the holidays:

“Ramadan is the holy month of Islam. It is a month of fast from sunrise to sundown. Muslims not only restrain from food and drink, but also from unnecessary distractions to your faith and community such as music, excessive attention to appearance and/or TV, etc.

“During this month, your fast will not be accepted if you are unkind to someone, use foul language, rude or aggressive behavior, etc. You try to limit bad deeds, and focus on consistently committing good deeds. It is a month meant to be experienced in peace, and connect you to Allah (God) as well as the people around you.

“Muslims donate food and money to the poor. Some will try to focus on a family to actively feed. Each night, Muslims who are able to make it to the mosque after sundown will pray Ramadan prayers to ask for forgiveness, peace and relief in the world, and whatever else an individual would like to pray for.

“The purpose of Ramadan is to connect you to your faith, and community. It teaches a Muslim empathy for the hungry, and makes them conscious of their role in community and earth in general. A proper Muslim role is meant to be filled with peace, generosity, kindness, and humbleness.”