Happening This Weekend - 5/24/2019

Wishing you the best Memorial Day Weekend, and a sunlit slide into summer! Will you be wearing white pants? Darryl's can certainly give you more colorful options, as can many stores on Main Street in A Little Beacon Blog's Shopping Guide. Stop into their neighbor, Knot Too Shabby, to get gorgeous furniture paint and stencils as you start a new summer project. Owner Caryn is an amazing furniture painter and can give you tips! And here's one more hot tip: to-go wine sippy cups (for lack of a better word) are at Beacon Natural right now, located in the middle of Main Street near the Post Office. Drink in a stemless glass, but in a to-go cup with lid!

See below for ideas on things to do!
Sponsored by Antalek and Moore for car insurance.
 

International Film Night
Day
: Friday, May 24, 2019
Time: 7pm
Location: Howland Public Library, 313 Main St, Beacon, NY
Information >

Open Barn at Stony Kill Farm
Day
: Saturday, May 25, 2019
Time: 11am-1pm
Location: Stony Kill Farm, 79 Farmstead Lane, Wappingers Falls, NY
Information >

The Artichoke Storytelling Series
Day
: Saturday, May 25, 2019
Time: 8pm
Location: The Howland Cultural Center, 477 Main St, Beacon, NY
Information >

Dia: Beacon “Hudson Valley Free Day”
Day
: Sunday, May 26, 2019
Time: 11am-6pm
Location: Dia:Beacon, 3 Beekman Street, Beacon NY 
Information >

Beacon Elk’s Lodge Car Show - POSTPONED
Postponed until autumn, according to the Beacon Free Press.

Memorial Day Ceremony & Parade
Day:
Monday, May 27, 2019
Time: 1pm (lineup 12pm Noon)
Location: American Legion - Beacon Post, 413 Main St, Beacon, NY
American Legion Post 203 invites all veteran groups, civic organizations, and clubs to participate in this year's Memorial Day Parade and services on Monday, May 27th. Lineup is 12pm noon and the parade starts at 1pm. Memorial Services will follow immediately after the parade at the Memorial Building, 413 Main Street. For more information, call Tony at (845) 489-7937.
Information >


Plan ahead and check out what's coming up this month in our Events Guide.
 

 
 
BOUTIQUES ON THE WEST END


Darryl's Women's Clothing Boutique
155 Main Street
www.darrylsny.com

It's hot hot hot! Darryl's Clothing Boutique has all of the light dresses that are easy breezy and will let the wind keep you cool this Memorial Day Weekend. Sales are going on now, so treat yourself to a deal, and pair a necklace and shoulder bag with it. You want to look fresh at that picnic!


 
Luxe Optique
183 Main Street

www.luxeoptique.com
Couldn't pick just one of these Lenore frames at Luxe Optique right now, so we are showing you the fade from white to Rosé. Would you like a glass with that? Do treat yourself, and consider different colors of transitions for your lenses if you want easy shade. The handsom red frame above is from Jacques Marie Mage, and you can try that on as well.



 
 

BOUTIQUES ON THE EAST END

Lambs Hill Bridal Boutique
1 East Main, Retail #3

www.lambshillbridalboutique.com
(near the Dummy Light)
Lambs Hill Bridal Boutique is having a special Sample Sale this Memorial Day Weekend. All of their samples, including this satin Justin Alexander A-line are an additional 20% off! Friday-Monday only! So if you’re going for a spur of the moment elopement you don’t want to miss this sale!!

Thank you to the following shops for sponsoring our Shopping Guide! Luxe Optique, Binnacle Books, Darryl's Boutique, and Lambs Hill.




 

Barb's Butchery
69 Spring Street

www.barbsbutchery.com
(near the Dummy Light)
Got your patties for the weekend backyard chill? Call Barb's to pre-order anything for pick-up!
 
Thank you to Barb's Butchery and BAJA 328 for sponsoring the Restaurant Guide!
Visit A Little Beacon Blog's Restaurant Guide for all of the restaurants in Beacon, and see our Brunch Guide for your morning!

 
 

Firefly Yoga & Juicebar
Location: 992 Main St, Fishkill, NY
Do you want to introduce your child to yoga? Firefly Yoga offers Lightning Bugs Kids Yoga, Mondays at 5:30.
Lightning Bugs Kids Yoga is for ages 4-10 and is an opportunity for kids to explore, create, play and move in a non-competitive environment.The class is focused on self expression and community.  
Information >

Please note, Firefly Yoga will only have one class on Memorial Day
Sweat Graditude Flow
Day
: Monday, May 27, 2019
Time: 9:30-10:45am

Book Reading at Binnacle Books:
"Eleanor, or, The Rejection of the Progress of Love,” by Anna Moschovakis
"Hey, Marfa" poems by Jeffrey Yang
Day
: Friday, May 24, 2019
Time: 7pm
Location: Binnacle Books, 321 Main Street, Beacon NY 
Information >

Book Reading:
Beacon Historical Society Presents "Hidden Treasures of the Hudson Valley - Vol. 3"
Day
: Wednesday, May 29, 2019
Time: 7pm
Location: St. Andrew's Church, 15 South Ave., Beacon NY 
Information >

Thank you to Firefly Yoga for sponsoring the Adult Classes Guide! For a full list of upcoming classes, classes during the week, and workshops of all kinds, visit our Adult Classes Guide.
 

Time is running out on camp choices. Research your camps here.
 

Anime Art Lesson
Ages:
11-17
Day: Saturday, May 25, 2019
Time: 10am or 2pm
Location: Stony Kill Environmental Center, 75 Farmstead Lane Wappingers Falls, NY
Information >

Story Time In The Garden
with Binnacle Books and One Nature
Day
: Saturday, May 25, 2019
Time: 12pm
Location: 321 Main Street, Beacon NY 
Bimonthly Story Time in the Garden with Binnacle and One Nature is a fun way for kids to connect with nature and reading.
Information >

For a full list of upcoming classes, visit A Little Beacon Blog's Kids Classes Guide
Submission Guidelines for submitting your classes for consideration to be added to these guides can be found here.

Time to freshen up your hair style - or beard! Find a salon in Beacon at
A Little Beacon Blog's Beauty Guide.
REAL ESTATE LISTINGS
320 Main Street, Beacon, NY 12508
Did someone say office space? This studio space is located above Rite Aid.
From Gate House Realty: From Gate House Realty: '"Bring your business and creativity to this renovated office / studio space on Main Street. Lots of light in this historic Beacon building.“
Price: $750/month
Details + Pictures >
VIEW THIS LISTING
VIEW ALL LISTINGS
HEADLINE NEWS FROM OUR SPONSORS

 
Antalek & Moore :: Business Insurance
Looking for Business Insurance? Antalek and Moore will do the homework you need, and ask you the right questions to get you into the best coverage. Call them today as your business grows: (845) 831-4300
       
A Little Beacon Space :: Event Venue
Host your Pop-Up, Business Meeting, Client Presentation, Workshop, and more. Now offering a special rate for Teachers and Music Recitals so that creative can happen easily.
Details >


BeaconArts Member Show :: Accepting Submissions
All BeaconArts members are invited to submit artwork for our first annual Member Show at Hudson Beach Gallery. The exhibition runs July 13 - August 4, and is curated by Theresa Gooby and Karlyn Benson.  Space is limited, so send your submissions to membershow@beaconarts.orgbefore May 24 to guarantee your spot.
Beacon Arts >
Tin Shingle
Did you ever wonder why or how someone got featured in a magazine or newspaper? If you have competition, or even a business or person who you admire - when they "get good ink" as the term goes when something is written about in a publication - was that just something wonderful that happened ot them? Most likely not. They most likey "pitched" the media outlet with a good angle or story idea. Tin Shingle teachers business owners, artists and makers how to do this. And can teach you too.
Learn More >

Beacon Chamber of Commerce
Business Directory
Is your business in the Business Directory of the Beacon Chamber of Commerce yet? It should be. Join here today.
Learn More >
JOB LISTINGS
The City of Beacon Seeks A Climate Smart Communities Coordinator
Details >

Luxe Optique Seeks A Licensed Optician And An Optometrist
Details >

List your job >
MASTHEAD
Producers of this newsletter include:
Katie Hellmuth Martin, Publisher, Writer, Designer, Photographer
Marilyn Perez, Managing Editor
Catherine Sweet, Editor of the Second Saturday Guide

Advertise With A Little Beacon Blog
The support from every advertiser of A Little Beacon Blog helps make local news get produced. You can be part of making it happen, and get your business in front of the community in a meaningful way.
NEWSLETTER SIGNUP

Until next week!

Beacon City School Budget Passes - The Highlight Reel of Budget Items - What Students Can Expect

The email came in from the Beacon City School District Superintendent, Dr. Matthew Landahl at 10:24pm, just hours after polling had closed and the votes were counted. He was announcing the passing of the Budget and additional buses for kids in the district. We asked him for his highlights of the budget, in a Cliffs Notes fashion. You can read the 2019/2020 budget presentation in full here.

Proposition 1 - The Budget

Beacon City School District 2019 Vote Results:

Proposition 1 Budget
Yes- 749
No-193
Total- 942

Proposition 2 Buses

Yes 727
No- 243
Total- 970

Proposition 3- Capital Transfer

Yes- 740
No- 232
Total- 972

Board Election
Meredith Heuer-814
Michael Rutkoske- 786
Antony Tseng- 678

Highlights Include:

  • Additional class size reduction teaching position at the elementary level. “We have added 7 of these positions the previous two years,” says the superintendent.

  • Music: Continuation of the currently grant-funded 4th grade instrumental music program with district funding of the band teacher position. A Little Beacon Blog wrote about that here when it started.

  • Business :Addition of Business teacher position at the high school to begin a Business education program for high school students

  • Art + Computers: Addition of a half-time Art teacher position at the high school to begin some digital design programming

  • Social Worker: Addition of a full-time Social Worker position at the high school to complement the social worker and psychologist already there. “We are hoping to hire someone with expertise in drug and alcohol counseling. The position would also work with middle school students,” says the superintendent.

  • Professional Development: Greatly expanded professional development for teachers

  • 1:1 Chromebook Initiative at the High School for all students

  • Interactive Whiteboards in all High School classes

  • Expanded partnership with Common Ground Farm and continued partnership with Hudson Valley Seed.

  • School Garden at Rombout Middle School.

  • Additional coursework at the high school which will not necessitate additional staff.

From the Budget Power Point, there will be additional High School programming in these areas:

  • Business Education Program - Planning year for internship model for 2020-2021

  • PLTW - Computer Science Program - Year 1 Computer Science Essentials

  • Italian Course

  • Art Coursework - Architecture Design, Interior Design, Sculpture

  • English Department

  • AP Language & Composition Course

  • Magic Realism in literature

  • Media Literacy

  • Research Literacy

Proposition 2 - The Buses

What does a vote of Yes mean? It grants Two 72 passenger buses and Four 20 passenger buses. Speaking of buses, the April deadline of getting in your request for your child to be bused has passed. So you better get on it if you need busing. This is for kids who live in the designated busing areas, or are bused to childcare locations.

Proposition 3 - Capital Transfer

When A Little Beacon Blog inquired as to the details of the Capital Transfer, the superintendent explained: “The Capital Transfer allows us to move money from a capital reserve to our capital project, namely to fund lights at the new turf field behind the high school being built this summer. Lights will help us use the field more often and also will allow the community to use the field more as well.”

In his email to Beacon families, and on the Beacon City School District website, Dr. Landahl concluded: “I want to give a huge thanks to the community for supporting our budget this year. We can't wait to start the new programs in this year's budget to help our students!”

Beacon Career Fair A Success With Teens, Businesses and Organizations

beacon-high-school-career-fair-success-MAIN.png

Great turnout at Beacon High School Career Fair today! Plenty of interested students asking questions...and foraging for free cookies. A Little Beacon Blog bribed passerby's with stickers, and for the writers and bloggers in the house (they are usually very shy and quiet when approaching the table), we gave writers our tote bag.

Each year we are happy to engage with teens to show them the resources they didn’t know about yet, like our recent article about the (free) Dia Teens Art Program, and the Open Sketch session at the Beacon Library. One student who visited the table is about to be published in the Poughkeepsie Journal for an article she wrote!

Salon Dae (the salon near Dutchess Airport) was in attendance with opportunities for hair stylists, and did braiding on the spot. Next to Salon Dae was Twins Barber Shop from Beacon’s Main Street who was clipping. The Twins always draw the largest crowd!

Across the way were the 🔥 fighters who were giving demonstrations using a smoke machine. Antalek and Moore brought their corn hole and had quite the competitions going on. For the rest of us, it was hard to compete with all that action!

Beacon career Fair 2019-Antalek-and-Moore.jpg

But the EMS Education table was in a good spot to reach interested first responders who need the education first to even get into the field. Other first responders included the Beacon Volunteer Ambulance Corp and the Police.

A Little Beacon Blog’s table was in between Wyngate’s caregivers table for men and women wanting to go into nursing and caregiving, which we learned provides job security as there has been a shortage of nurses, we were told.  Dutchess County Tourism was on our other side - where we learned all sorts of things like how they are organizing workshops for businesses to help educate about best practices, like ADA compliance for websites. Good stuff, those busy bees are doing over there!

If you’re a business who wants to represent at the Beacon Career Fair next year and reach the students, email the organizer and School counselor, Michele Polhamus at polhamus.m@beaconk12.org. The notification about the Career Fair usually goes out in March-ish for this annual May event.

Yearly School Bus Form Request Due For Students Riding School Buses

A message from the Beacon City School District:

If your child is going to a child care location for the 2019-2020 school year, and will need transportation to or from that site to their school, please submit a new transportation request form by April 1, 2019. By law, a new request is required each year by April 1st for the following year.

If your child will attend a non-public school for the 2019-2020 school year, and will need transportation, NYS law requires a written request each year. Please submit this request to the school district registrar's office before April 1st. Transportation to non-public schools may be provided by law for a distance of 15 miles.

Forms are available here on the district website or from the registrar's office at 10 Education Drive, Beacon, New York.

Applications Open For Dia Teens Art Program - Free For All Participants

High school students are able to enroll in the newest year of the Dia Teens Art Program (online application is here), a free program for all participants, that includes lunches, snacks, materials, and in-program transportation. Dia Teens is a program that offers young people the space, freedom, and support to make their ideas real. The deadline is May 26, 2019.

Teens collaborate with others, including an appointed artist in resident “artist ally,” to work in original, self-directed projects. In addition to art-making, they learn and practice skills related to critical thinking and self-expression. They will identify, question and challenge ideas related to contemporary art.

“Some make art, some channel their creativity in other ways,” according to the online application at Dia Beacon. Fifteen high school students from across the Hudson Valley will be selected. Visiting artists facilitate workshops, participate in discussions, host teens in their studio and gallery spaces, lead critiques, and invite teens to participate in their own projects. Past guest artists include artists Joëlle Tuerlinckx, Mary Mattingly, Sal Randolph, as well as teens from the Studio Museum in Harlem, New Museum, and Park Avenue Armory.

The Dia Teens art program lasts all year, with a Summer Intensive from July 8 - August 8 2019, and picks up again in October 2019 for the entire school year.

Dia Teens is at based at Dia:Beacon, 3 Beekman Street Beacon New York 12508. The museum and parking lot overlook the Hudson River. If you haven’t been down there yet, do go. The scenery is incredible.

To apply to Dia Teens: visit this link. Students must be enrolled in high school.

Deadline: May 26, 2019.

Giant Yellow Marker Collection Recycling Box At South Avenue and Sargent Elementary Schools

Photo Credit: South Avenue Elementary

Photo Credit: South Avenue Elementary

“Penny,” the marker collection box at Sargent Elementary.  Photo Credit: Anna Sullivan Youatt

“Penny,” the marker collection box at Sargent Elementary.
Photo Credit: Anna Sullivan Youatt

With recycling markets tanking everywhere (see New York Times article “As Costs Skyrocket, More U.S. Cities Stop Recycling”) now that China is not buying most of the recycling it used to - especially from the United States - it’s clear that it’s becoming harder to recycle, and waste has been building up more than we realized.

Crayola Launches Fun Marker Collection Recycling Bins

What is catching on, therefore, is increased awareness of where people can tweak the small stuff in their lives to get rid of stuff without throwing it into the trash. Crayola offers this initiative for schools looking to reduce waste. It’s called ColorCycle, and information can be found here. Says South Avenue’s Principal Laura Cahill: “The South Avenue PTA started the color box in conjunction with Crayola ColorCycle, and we are encouraging families to send in their old markers throughout the year. We also put markers in here at school as they get used up during class.”

Says Ryan Green, Vice President of South Avenue’s PTA: “Any kind of marker can be collected from any brand. Dry-erase, permanent, doesn't matter. You can send them to school with your kids, and teachers send the little messengers to dump the markers into the tube.”

market collection vase.JPG

How To Contain The Dead Markers Before Depositing Into Marker Collection Box

If you’re in a house that is has a high marker-loss count, where tops and dried-out bodies are found scattered on the floor and in the couch, they now have a place to rest and find a second life. If you don’t have a kid at South Avenue, consider setting aside your markers for a friend who does.

To get into the habit of keeping trashed markers out of the regular trash can, simply designate a pretty box or container in your home, and collect the markers over time. I just stepped on a dead blue dry-erase marker last night. Top on the floor, body on the desk. Dried out and done.

Also, Bottles and Cans Collections For Recycling And Fundraising

The South Avenue PTA, and several other PTA/Os at other schools, also have Bottle and Can Collection points where you can give them your bottles and cans instead of putting them into your big orange top recycling bin. It has been announced by recycling professionals at Beacon City Council meetings that glass collection is becoming difficult to sort through. Broken glass contaminates the recycling collection at large, and can make it so that big batches of waste (aka recycling materials) are no longer eligible to be recycled.

Last Day Of Beacon Open Studios - Check Out These Artists!

Beacon Open Studios-
Days: Sat, May 18th & Sun, May 19th 2019
Time: 12pm- 6pm
Location: City wide in Beacon NY!
Get the map online or find their brochure in stores!

Sunday is your last day to visit the studios of artists in Beacon Open Studios 2019. For some artists, this could be the only chance you can see their art up close and in person. There are so many artists involved - check them out here! And find them by address here.

Some you have been following on Instagram, others you have seen in galleries or spotted in magazines. Take this Sunday to get out there on foot, bike or car to explore the creatives around you.

When you see the red Beacon Open Studios dot outside of a home or building, pull over! A few artists we have spotted in Instagram:

Photo Credit: Matthew William Robinson

Photo Credit: Matthew William Robinson

Photo Credit: Third Must Metal Arts

Photo Credit: Third Must Metal Arts

Photo Credit: Dichotomy Home

Photo Credit: Dichotomy Home

Photo Credit: Agouti Studios

Photo Credit: Agouti Studios

Photo Credit: Rexhill Studio

Photo Credit: Rexhill Studio

Photo Credit: @Kennifs

Photo Credit: @Kennifs

Happening This Weekend - 5/17/2019

Beacon's long awaited, first interactive art event of the Spring season has arrived - Beacon Open Studios. This weekend, dozens of artists open their homes or studios to you so that you can see their work, and see how they work. Pick up a brochure map in different stores around town, or click here to visit their map and have it open as you walk around. This year they have created Studio Tour lists, which is a suggested micro-list of artists to hit up in a group. This is helpful for those who can't decide who to visit. Read up on the different artists here before you head out.

Lots to do this weekend! Happy planning.
Sponsored by Antalek and Moore for car insurance.
 

Beacon Open Studios Kickoff Party
Day:
Friday May 17, 2019
Time: 6-9pm
Location: Oak Vino Wine Bar, 389 Main St, Beacon, NY

Beacon Open Studios Weekend
Days: May 17-19, 2019
Time: 12-6pm
City-wide exploration of artists in their studios. Studios can be in an artist's home or in a different location. Pick up a printed map/brochure of where to find each artist in Oak Vino Wine Bar and other storefronts.
Information >

50th Anniversary Celebrating Launch of Clearwater
Day
: Friday, May 17, 2019
Time: 3:45pm
Location: Ferry Dock, Beacon, NY (adjacent to Metro North Station)
Information >

Beacon Volunteer Ambulance Corps Presents Community Safety Day
Day
: Saturday, May 18, 2019
Time: 12-4pm
Location: City of Beacon Fire Dept, 13 South Ave, Beacon, NY
Information >

Clearwater Dockside Event and 50th Anniversary Celebration
Day
: Saturday, May 18, 2019
Time: 2:30pm
Location: 2 Red Flynn Drive, Beacon, NY 
Information >

Baby Shark’s Treasure Hunt
Day
: Saturday, May 18, 2019
Time: 1pm, 3:30pm
Location: Howland Cultural Center, 477 Main St, Beacon, NY
Information >

Pastor's Aide Ministry presents an Afternoon of Fashion
Men and women will be wearing all types of clothing, including Afro Centric outfits. Says organizer Jennifer McClinton: "We will also be selling African Soaps, clothing, jewelry and women’s Hats." Hats!
Day: Saturday, May 18, 2019
Time: 3pm
Location: Springfield Baptist Church, 8 Mattie Cooper Sq, Beacon, NY
Information >

Comedy Night at the Elks Lodge
Day
: Saturday, May 18, 2019
Time: Seating at 7pm; Starts at 8pm
Location: Beacon Elks Lodge #1493, 900 Wolcott Ave., Beacon, NY
Information >

Imagination Playhouse Presents "The Very Scary Berry,"
Days
: Sat & Sun, May 18-19, 2019
Time: 6:30pm (Sat), 2pm (Sun)
Location: University Settlement Camp Theater, 724 Wolcott Ave (9D), Beacon, NY
Information >

Sweets Festival Bake Sale at Springfield Baptist Church
Day
: Sunday, May 19, 2019
Time: 1:30pm (immediately after the church service)
Location: Springfield Baptist Church, 8 Mattie Cooper Sq, Beacon, NY
Information >

Howland Chamber Music Circle Presents Horszowski Trio & Masumi Per Rostad (Viola)
Day
: Sunday, May 19, 2019
Time: 4pm
Location: Howland Cultural Center, 477 Main St, Beacon, NY
Information >
Plan ahead and check out what's coming up this month in our Events Guide.
 
ARF's 4th Annual 5K Run/Walk With The Dogs
Day: Sunday, May 19, 2019
Time: 10:00 am
Location: Memorial Park, Beacon, NY
Information >

Off Broadway 5K
Day
: Sunday, May 19, 2019
Time: 7-11am
Location: 111 Broadway, Newburgh, NY
Information >

Find out about more upcoming races in our 5K Races Guide.

 
 
BOUTIQUES ON THE WEST END


Darryl's Women's Clothing Boutique
155 Main Street
www.darrylsny.com

One of our favorite flouncy dresses has made its debut into the window of Darryl's Clothing Boutique! We featured it a few weeks ago in our InstaStory and are so happy to see this sassy lady wearing it for you to see. Come into Darryl's today or this weekend and let them put together an outfit for you. Plus - did you see the purse we featured yesterday in our Stories is a large round shape with a surprise inside? It's only playing on Instagram for a few more hours.

 
Luxe Optique
183 Main Street

www.luxeoptique.com
One of the most frequently asked questions Luxe Optique was getting from customers was: "Do you have theo? We want theo!" Well ask no longer! Seek and you shall find! A plethora of theo frames have arrived to Luxe Optique and you will want to check them out. The sampling here does not even show you the color range. But we couldn't resist showing you the clear frame paired with tortoiseshell.
 

BOUTIQUES ON THE EAST END

Lambs Hill Bridal Boutique
1 East Main, Retail #3

www.lambshillbridalboutique.com
(near the Dummy Light)
Let  Lambs Hill Bridal Boutique help you make the smallest member of your bridal party feel like a princess in this tulle skirt like this one by La Petite Hayley Paige.

Thank you to the following shops for sponsoring our Shopping Guide! Luxe Optique, Binnacle Books, Darryl's Boutique, and Lambs Hill.




 

Barb's Butchery
69 Spring Street

www.barbsbutchery.com
(near the Dummy Light)
Barb's Butchery debuts this Sunday at the Farmer's Market at Veterans Place off Main Street! Let the aromas lure you there...
 
Thank you to Barb's Butchery and BAJA 328 for sponsoring the Restaurant Guide!
Visit A Little Beacon Blog's Restaurant Guide for all of the restaurants in Beacon, and see our Brunch Guide for your morning!

 
 
 
Firefly Yoga & Juicebar
Location: 992 Main St, Fishkill, NY
Early Bird Pricing for the 200 Hour Yoga Teacher Training at Firefly ends May 20th! Training begins August 2019 through December 2019.
Information >

Intro To Pour Paintings
Day
: Saturday, May 18, 2019
Time: 10-11:30am
Location: River Winds Gallery, 172 Main St, Beacon, NY
Information >

iPhoneography Workshop w/ Mary Ann Glass
Day
: Saturday, May 18, 2019
Time: 10am-12pm
Location: River Winds Gallery, 172 Main St, Beacon, NY
Information >

Mudras Towards Meditation
Day
: Saturday, May 18, 2019
Time: 1-3pm
Location: Bebhakti Yoga, 89 Dewindt Street, Beacon, NY
Information >

Dot Mandala Meditation with Meredith
Day
: Sunday, May 19, 2019
Time: 1pm
Location: Createspace Beacon, 145 Main St, Beacon, NY
Information >
Thank you to Firefly Yoga for sponsoring the Adult Classes Guide! For a full list of upcoming classes, classes during the week, and workshops of all kinds, visit our Adult Classes Guide.
 

Time is running out on camp choices. Research your camps here.
 

Art & Zine Club Meetup
Day: Friday, May 17, 2019
Time: 3:30-5pm
Location: Howland Public Library, 313 Main St, Beacon, NY
Information >

Wow! For Kids - Jr. Paleontologist
Day
: Saturday, May 18, 2019
Time: 10am-12pm
Location: Water Ecology Center in Dennings Point Park, 199 Dennings Ave, Beacon, NY
Information >



For a full list of upcoming classes, visit A Little Beacon Blog's Kids Classes Guide
Submission Guidelines for submitting your classes for consideration to be added to these guides can be found here.

Time to freshen up your hair style - or beard! Find a salon in Beacon at
A Little Beacon Blog's Beauty Guide.
REAL ESTATE LISTINGS
291 Main Street, Beacon, NY 12508
ROOMS: Rooms and Offices on 3 Floors   BATHS: 2 half baths
The Telephone Building, one of Beacon's most pristine building rennovations in Beacon, is as versatile as it is well maintained. People who have been considering purchasing this gem have asked: "Can it be lived in?" And the answer is: Yes! You can own this building in a Live/Work status, which means that you could live in it, and have some kind of commercial space (your office, showroom, gallery, event venue space, etc.). Want to see pictures and more details?
Price: $1.24 million
For Sale By Owner: Deborah Bigelow | Click here to contact her directly
Details + Pictures >
VIEW THIS LISTING
VIEW ALL LISTINGS
HEADLINE NEWS FROM OUR SPONSORS

 
Antalek & Moore :: Business Insurance
Looking for Business Insurance? Antalek and Moore will do the homework you need, and ask you the right questions to get you into the best coverage. Call them today as your business grows: (845) 831-4300
       
A Little Beacon Space :: Event Venue
Host your Pop-Up, Business Meeting, Client Presentation, Workshop, and more. Now offering a special rate for Teachers and Music Recitals so that creative can happen easily.
Details >


BeaconArts Member Show :: Accepting Submissions
All BeaconArts members are invited to submit artwork for our first annual Member Show at Hudson Beach Gallery. The exhibition runs July 13 - August 4, and is curated by Theresa Gooby and Karlyn Benson.  Space is limited, so send your submissions to membershow@beaconarts.orgbefore May 24 to guarantee your spot.
Beacon Arts >

Katie James :: Banner Is Up!

The banner Katie James Inc. designed for the Rock Out 4 Mental Health concert is hanging now about Main Street in Beacon, NY, in preparation for the June 1st event. Katie James Inc. was happy to donate branding assets to this innitiative.
What Can Katie James Inc. Do For You? >
Tin Shingle
Did you ever wonder why or how someone got featured in a magazine or newspaper? If you have competition, or even a business or person who you admire - when they "get good ink" as the term goes when something is written about in a publication - was that just something wonderful that happened ot them? Most likely not. They most likey "pitched" the media outlet with a good angle or story idea. Tin Shingle teachers business owners, artists and makers how to do this. And can teach you too.
Learn More >

Beacon Chamber of Commerce
Business Directory
Is your business in the Business Directory of the Beacon Chamber of Commerce yet? It should be. Join here today.
Learn More >
JOB LISTINGS
The City of Beacon Seeks A Climate Smart Communities Coordinator
Details >

Luxe Optique Seeks A Licensed Optician And An Optometrist
Details >

List your job >
MASTHEAD
Producers of this newsletter include:
Katie Hellmuth Martin, Publisher, Writer, Designer, Photographer
Marilyn Perez, Managing Editor
Catherine Sweet, Editor of the Second Saturday Guide

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Until next week!

Sneak Peek Into Beacon Open Studios 2019 - Kickoff Is This Weekend! e

Kick Off Party- Friday
Day: May 17th 2019
Time: 6pm-9pm

Oak Vino Wine Bar 
389 Main st. Beacon, NY

Beacon Open Studios-
Days: Sat, May 18th & Sun, May 19th 2019
Time: 12pm- 6pm
Location: City wide in Beacon NY!
Get the map online or find their brochure in stores!

While Beacon celebrates it’s local artists all year long, the Beacon Open Studios weekend is special because once a year artists of Beacon open their art studios to the public. This free, citywide, weekend-long event has become one of the largest of its kind in the Hudson Valley. A Little Beacon Blog is happy to once again be a sponsor for Beacon Open Studios 2019 the weekend of May 17-19.

Sneak Peek Into Performances and Art

The artists have been promoting their studios and exihibits in anticipation of this weekend. A few interesting pieces crossed our inbox, so we’re spotlighting them here on the blog.

Visit Beacon Open Studios website for a directory and map of participating artists and you can plan out your visits. They even offer four different tour suggestions to help you navigate through the area. You can also pick up a brochure and map at various locations throughout Main Street. You can also wing it on your own and just follow the red dots that will be all over the city.

A-Y/Dancers Perform at Kube (aka the Old Beacon High School)

Included with the open studios will be a live performance from the A-Y/Dancers at the KuBe Theater in the old Beacon High School Saturday, May 18th at 5pm and 7pm. They will also perform at the Ethan Cohen Gallery beforehand in the hallway.

As part of their inaugural season, A-Y/dancers licensed a unique “MinEvent” from the Merce Cunningham Trust. The performance, titled “Embodied Time: A Collaborative Performance” is an arrangement of excerpts from works that Cunningham choreographed in the span of 3 decades, from the 60’s to the 90’s, strung together by Jean Freebury, former member of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. There is a audio component as well. A unique score composed and performed by sound artist Mark Trecka will consist of audio recordings of the dancers’ bodies during rehearsals, transferred to cassette, but into loops, and amplified back into the room in real time. In a sychronistic approach, the artist Joseph Ayers created a unique animation that samples the dancers movements recorded during rehearsals, and then projects the resulting abstraction as a backdrop to the live performance.

Below is a teaser video if what you will see live on Saturday!

3 Artists at Caiming Cheung’s Studio

The jeweler Caiming Cheung has opened up her studio to the potter Virginia Piazza and the painter Chris Sanders. Caiming’s studio is at 70 Eliza Street.

Photo Credit: Virginia Piazza

Photo Credit: Virginia Piazza

Photo Credit: Caiming Ceung

Photo Credit: Caiming Ceung

Photo Credit: Chris Saunders

Photo Credit: Chris Saunders

For The Photography Lovers

Some photography work featured this weekend.

Photo Credit: randy calderone

Photo Credit: randy calderone

Photo credit: michael bogdanffy kriegh

Photo credit: michael bogdanffy kriegh

photo credit: dale Leifeste

photo credit: dale Leifeste

Furniture Making

photo credit: Chris ungaro

photo credit: Chris ungaro

Photo credit: Justin King

Photo credit: Justin King

Mixed Media

photo credit: Kat stoutenborough

photo credit: Kat stoutenborough

photo credit: johana skalsky presence

photo credit: johana skalsky presence

photo credit: Patricia Di Bella-Kreger

photo credit: Patricia Di Bella-Kreger

The Reel Life Film Club Screening Of Documentary "Artisans Of Beacon" June 7th!

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The Reel Life Film Club for tweens and teens returns to Beacon. On June 7th, at 6pm, the Howland Public Library will present a special test screening of the film, Artisans of Beacon, a documentary directed by Michael Gersh. 

 Artisans of Beacon is a portrait of 6 artisans based in Beacon, NY. Jon Joseph is a welder, Jessica Wickham is a woodworker, Deb Davidovits is a beekeeper, Lisa Tompkins is a donut maker and owner of Glazed Over Donuts, Eva Gronowitz is a puppet maker and John Vergara is a luthier. Each artisan describes their art, how they got involved in their field and why they love doing what they do. They all share a powerful passion for their crafts.

After the film, teens will have an opportunity to meet the filmmaker as well as some of the artisans. The filmmaker, Michael Gersh, is also a technology teacher at Beacon High School so this is a wonderful opportunity for students interested in filmmaking to ask question of a local filmmaker and teacher. Terry Nelson, former director of Beacon Independent Film Festival will moderate the discussion. 

Reel Life Film Club is an opportunity for middle school students to view documentary films and talk about them with inspiring people. Now in its third year, the film series is a collaboration between the Beacon, Cold Spring and Garrison libraries. A new film is shown each month, rotating between the three locations. 

All students in grades 6 and up are invited to the screening. Pizza will be served at the event and registration is encouraged to ensure there in enough pizza for everyone. To register to attend the June 7th screening of Artisans of Beacon, email community@beaconlibrary.org.

Tioronda Garden Club Honors All Beacon Residents Who Have Served With Blue Star Marker Memorial

2019 marks the 90th Anniversary of the Tioronda Garden Club. On this occasion, the garden club is proud to donate and present a Blue Star Memorial Marker to the City of Beacon honoring all Beacon residents who have served and those serving to protect the freedom and safety of this nation.

Armed Forces Day - May 18

The ceremony will take place on Armed Forces Day, Saturday, May 18, 2019 at 11:00 a.m. in front of Beacon City Hall, One Municipal Plaza, Route 9D. Denise Van Buren, First Vice-President General of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) and a Blue Star Mother, will officiate at the dedication ceremony and unveiling.

The Tioronda Garden Club welcomes and encourages the public to join in this extraordinary event honoring all the brave men and women from Beacon who have served through the decades and those presently serving and will serve to protect and preserve this great nation.

Blue Star Marker Program

The history of the Blue Star Marker program began in 1945 when the National Garden Clubs, (the parent organization), was seeking a suitable means of honoring World War II veterans. In 1951, the program was extended to honor all men and women of service in the Armed Forces of the United States. Rhode Island was the first state to adopt the memorial marker program followed within three years by thirty-two more states. The Blue Star Memorial exists now all across this nation.

The event in Beacon on May 18 marks the first Blue Star Memorial Marker dedicated in Dutchess County. This impressive marker measures 41” high and by 45” wide with an overall height when erected of 7’ 6”. It will be installed by the City of Beacon Highway Department.

Take Part in BeaconArts Upcoming Member Show! Submissions Now Open!

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All BeaconArts members are invited to submit artwork for our first annual Member Show at Hudson Beach Gallery at 162 Main Street. The exhibition runs July 13-August 4, and is curated by Theresa Gooby and Karlyn Benson.

Space is limited, so send your submissions to membershow@beaconarts.org before May 24 to guarantee your spot. All mediums are welcome. For complete details and submission guidelines please visit their website.

If you would like to participate, but are not a member or need to renew, please click here to join today.


BeaconArts is a Community Partner of A Little Beacon Blog and is part of our Sponsor Spotlight program. This article was part of their monthly messaging partnership. Thank you for supporting organizations who support us!

Beacon's City Wide Yard Sale Is Back for 2019

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Now is your chance to kick your Spring Cleaning into high clear! It’s time to clear out the attic, basement, junk drawers and whatever other items you’re willing to let go of and see it off to a new home. The City of Beacon is once again hosting their City Wide Yard Sale held on Saturday, June 8, 2019 from 9am to 3pm. There is still time to register!

Get The Word Out

You can advertise your sale through the City of Beacon ahead of time to get the word out and gather some interest. List your yard sale for $10.00 or talk to your neighbors and list 3 for $20.00. Your sale will be listed by street address. This list will be available to shoppers on the morning of the sale at the Recreation Center as well as online for the weeks leading up to the sale. You will also receive a City Wide Yard Sale sign to mark your house on the day of the sale. The City Wide Yard Sale will be locally advertised in print and online by the Recreation Department.

No Yard? No Problem!

Not enough stuff to set up a whole sale? Consider being part of the Sale at the Center this year. The city will have space and an 8 foot table waiting for you here at our Recreation Center. Bring a chair, an umbrella and your wares for sale and we will have a Flea Market here at 23 West Center Street. All this for $15 and your sale will be part of our list. Use the same form to sign up.

RSVP on Facebook

Dutchess County Legislature Votes 19-5 to Override Molinaro's Veto of Open Hours Extension for Wine and Liquor Stores

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A challenge to a law mandating that wine and liquor stores in Dutchess County must close by 7 pm on weekdays - with more limitations on select major holidays - has advanced twice through the Dutchess County Legislature by a wide majority. The new law proposes that the allowed hours be extended to 9 pm on weekdays and on select major holidays. The first vote of approval of extending open hours occurred on April 8, 2019 and was 18-6. That vote was vetoed by County Executive Marcus Molinaro. Tonight, on Monday, May 13, 2019, the Dutchess County Legislators met again to vote to override that veto, and did so with a vote of 19-5.

This vote allows the proposed open hours extension to go before the State Liquor Authority, who will hold a Public Comment period, and then make their final decision.

This law has been challenged before but never passed. Here’s a look at the twists and turns this particular issue has taken so far over the years:

What Is The Backstory?

Current Allowed Open Hours For Wine and Liquor Stores

9 am to 7 pm
Weekdays

9 am to 10 am
New Year's, Memorial, Independence, Labor, and Thanksgiving Day (set your alarm!)

9 am to 10 pm
The Day Before Thanksgiving, December 18th – 24th, and New Year's Eve

Proposed Extended Open Hours

9 am to 9 pm
Weekdays

9 am to 9 pm
New Year's, Memorial, Independence, Labor, and Thanksgiving days, and on the day before Thanksgiving, December 18th - 24th and New Year's Eve

Wine and liquor stores in Dutchess County have had to operate within shorter open hours than equivalent shops surrounding counties for years. The closing time is 7 pm, and during some holidays such as New Year's, Memorial, Independence, Labor, and Thanksgiving Day, they are allowed to be open for one hour, from 9 am to 10 am (set your alarm!).

Did Beacon Wine and Liquor Stores Ever Challenge The 7 pm Close Time, That They Now Call “Restrictive“?

The law was challenged by county legislators. In 2016, then-Dutchess County Legislator Jerry Landisi tried to get the open hours extended. The City of Beacon signed a Resolution (aka a law that says that they support something, so that it’s super official and has votes of council people). Mayor Casale backed it then, and continues to back it today.

During The 2016 Challenge, No Vote Happened. Some Stores Opposed The Extension.

“[The resolution proposing the extended hours] never made it out of committee,” says current Dutchess County Legislator, Frits Zernike, and author of the latest attempt to extend the open hours to 9 pm. “That seems to be because liquor store owners up county, in Poughkeepsie and beyond, are fearful of what expanded hours would mean. As they see it, they'd have to stay open later, never seeing their families, and face the certain prospect of being robbed after dark.“

In an email interview with A Little Beacon Blog, Mei Ying So, of Artisan Wine Shop in Beacon, recalled the last time the law was challenged: “We have never been contacted when legislation regarding extending operating hours was coming up before the committee in years past. The last time this came before the committee, it was defeated in committee and it was only through local media that we found out after the fact that it had even happened.”

Why Would A Store Oppose The Open Hours Extension?

Business owners in opposition feared that if the open hours were extended, that the shop would be required to stay open longer. However, this rule change would simply allow businesses to stay open later; it is not a mandate that the business must stay open until the latest permitted closing time. Some shop owners have voiced concerns that if a neighboring business is open, then they will lose business. Such is another example of fears of business competition potentially being written into law, which we are seeing possibly happen between the City of Beacon and prepared food vendors during the Beacon Farmers Market yearly lease negotiation.

In their own words, here are excerpts of some letters of opposition submitted during the course of 2014-2016:

Poughkeepsie Wine & Liquor Inc. wrote in, stating: “I want it to be known that I am against the extension of hours that we can be open in Dutchess County. We are a small business with a limited number of employees who work long hours already and who need some time with their families, especially on holidays and after work. Staying open later in the evening could also be a danger to our safety since we are small independent stores.”

Cotter’s Wine and Liquor Store, in Pleasant Valley, wrote in: “I am opposed to opening on New Year’s, Memorial, Independence, Labor and Thanksgiving days. People plan for holiday parties. Those days are our holidays too and we want to spend them with our families. I am also opposed to extended hours year round. They do not equate to increased income, but rather to increased expenses. Before proposing any such legislation, a poll of all liquor stores should have been taken.”

Said Charel’s Liquors in Lagrangeville, N.Y. “I need the members to understand that we know this is a choice to open on holidays and extend hours, but you are forcing our hand. You will be taking business away from us that would just come back to us the next day. The law to allow stores to open on Sundays has done nothing but take away from family time for our business. It has simply spread our sales out that we would have made on Saturday and Monday.”

Family time was the theme of other letters.

This Time Around, Petitions Were Put Forth By Store Owners In Favor Of Hours Extension, In Addition To Opposition

In March of 2019, stores in the Beacon area put out petitions for signatures. Says Mei of Artisan Wine: “We (four stores in all - Artisan Wine Shop, Pioneer Wine & Liquor, Beacon Wine Shoppe, and Boutique Wines, Spirits and Ciders in Fishkill) collected over 1,000 signatures from consumers, all taxpayers, most are residents. Hundreds of emails and Facebook messages in support were sent to the Legislature. And the legislators themselves talked to many of the stores in their districts. Legislator Frits Zernike did a lot of leg work to inform stores as well, months ago.”

Supporters showed up at the Dutchess County Legislature meeting about it on Thursday, April 4 (watch it here), which would be a time to officially ask for the vote on Monday, April 8, to ask the State Liquor Authority to extend the hours.

Who spoke in support?

According to Mei, who attended that meeting: “There were nine people speaking in support of the legislation: from Artisan Wine Shop, Mei Ying So, Tim Buzinski and Sam Lozoff; Kitty Sherpa, co-owner of Beacon Natural Market (she also read a letter in support from Wineology in Pawling); Jessica Gonzalez, Beacon resident and well-known, award-winning bartender; Hal Newell, owner of Harker House Wine & Spirits in Clinton Corners; Paige Fiori, co-owner of Boutique Wines, Spirits and Ciders in Fishkill, and her husband; and one of Paige's customers.”

Beacon’s Mayor Casale attended to voice his support for the hours extension as well.

Who spoke against?

Stores speaking against included Arlington Wine in Poughkeepsie, Southside in Poughkeepsie, some stores in Hyde Park, and a speaker who a customer of one of the Hyde Park store owners. You can watch the whole April 8 session here, where the Public Comments start at minute 35.

Legislator Zernike wrote into the 2019 resolution a recommendation about how competition should be handled: “Concerns about crime, lost or increased business and revenue, as well as quality of life issues arising from decisions regarding hours of operation are best resolved by individual business owners, rather than subject to legislative regulation or edict.”

Voting Round 1 Results: 18-6; Which Is Vetoed By County Executive Marcus Molinaro

After hearing from the public who traveled from several areas of Dutchess County to attend, the Dutchess County Legislature voted 18-6 In favor of hours extension, which would move along the law change to the State Liquor Authority for their final vote.

The Legislature’s vote must go before the County Executive Marcus Molinaro to approve or veto. In a letter of support for the hours extension, the County Executive stated that “Restrictive State policies and outdated laws governing this industry have created an uneven playing field that should be addressed. Further, in may ways, the State Liquor Authority remains an institution rooted in the past, unable to keep up with the rapidly changing market, local needs, and the concerns of the State’s and Dutchess County’s residents. A better system would devolve authority and allow local municipalities with their zoning regulations to regulate the retail sale of wine and liquor for off-premises consumption. It is befuddling, at best, as to why New York has maintained this Prohibition-era regime, and I do not know how this County became the last in the state to enable extended hours of operation.”

With that letter of support, Molinaro vetoed the resolution, stating that it needed more time for public comment and awareness to mayors and supervisors.

Dutchess County Legislature Overrides Molinaro’s Veto 19-5

Back to this past Monday, May 13, 2019, weeks after that veto. The Dutchess County Legislature met again to acquire enough votes to override the veto, which they did. The resolution will now proceed to the State Liquor Authority, to open up for Public Comment once again, and then the final decision will be made.

Stay tuned…

Farmers Market Hears A Loud Towne Crier - Market Almost Pushed Over - Public Cries To Keep As Is

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Drama just happened with the Beacon Farmers Market prior to its opening outside this May. The market is indoors all winter, and moves outside in the spring. This year, before signing a one-year lease renewal with the City of Beacon, the market was told by the City Council that it would need to move from its spot on Veterans Place, and set up instead down the street at the county-owned DMV parking lot, which is a free municipal lot on weekends (weekday evenings). The issues that emerged are a bit more involved than a simple move, and they warrant a discussion about how the vibe of living in Beacon is impacted by the Farmers Market. So, we’ll try to unpack it here.

PS: We can skip to the end to say that the Farmers Market IS open outdoors on Sundays right now at their same location on Veterans Place. But DO read through this article to learn more!

Brief Backstory

The Beacon Farmers Market operated down at the waterfront for many years. [Edit: 5/12/19] Prior to that, it operated on Veterans Place. Says a consumer, Erin Ann in social media: “I lived on Henry Street in the brick house across from [when the location was at Veterans Place]. I remember because [the location] was so convenient for me, and then I was sad when it moved to the waterfront.”

The waterfront location was a happy place to trek down to, but it was a trek. It was far, involved a steep hill, and limited parking in my experience - but people found their way down regardless. Some people, like Kelli Cavatelli, felt that parking worked there, as she stated in social media: “There was the entire train station parking lot. There was tons of parking. I never once had an issue parking at the waterfront. I do however find it difficult to park at the Veterans Place location. It is an awful location!!” Sales at the market have increased by 35 percent since the market moved from the waterfront back up to Veterans Place, despite the parking issue.

Parking on Main Street in Beacon on the weekend is virtually non-existent, no matter how you slice it or where you are trying to go. The DMV parking lot is one of the only options for weekend parking on Main Street when the on-street parking spots are taken.

Three years ago, the Beacon Farmers Market proposed a move from the waterfront to Beacon’s Main Street. The best fit was found to be at Veterans Place, in-between the Post Office and the Towne Crier Cafe, and across from Beacon Natural Market. The goal was to give people easier access to the produce, food, gifts, music, and enjoyable atmosphere it created. It would return to the place where it was even before its waterfront location.

The market also began offering SNAP benefits, so that people with lower incomes could have access to fresh food. According to this article in the Highlands Current by Jeff Simms, “That allowed more people access, organizers said, and vendor sales increased 35 percent, with almost three times the number of low-income residents receiving discounted produce.” The move was a success, and more people accessed the market than ever before.

Originally, when the move was approved, both the Towne Crier and surrounding businesses including Beacon Natural Market (a direct competitor with produce sales) and More Good supported the decision. More Good even set up a vendor table there.

Customers supported the move: Beacon citizens, as well as people driving through Beacon or day tripping, backed up the decision with their spending habits. At the March 25, 2019 Workshop meeting in which the annual renewal of the market’s lease agreement with the City was discussed, as well as a possible move from Veterans Place to the DMV parking lot, Council Member Amber Grant, pointed out: “When the Farmers Market moved to Main Street, there was more use of SNAP. It is a really important consideration, and one we should consider while keeping the Farmers Market accessible.”

For this renewal meeting, two letters of complaints were submitted as supporting documentation. However, when the Farmers Market manager, Paloma Wake, inquired as to who the complaints were from during the Workshop meeting, she was told to go to the City website to find out, where the letters were posted as supporting document PDFs.

Not having a laptop in front of her at the meeting, she couldn’t readily go find out who the letters were from or what they said. But at some other meetings, the supporting letters are read aloud to help debate both sides. They were not read this night. The letters referenced can be read and downloaded here. The letters were from Phil Ciganer, owner of Towne Crier, and Mai Jacobs, a Beacon resident, written to specifically support the Towne Crier’s position. Excerpts from Phil’s letter are below:

 

First, let me say again that I support local farms and farmers, and we purchase much of produce from them, so the concept of a "farmers market," with local producers and purveyors, was attractive to me when I was approached by Sara a couple of years ago, when she was soliciting support to relocate the market from the waterfront. I extended my support at that time; however, I also expressed my concern to her that, as my venue serves Sunday brunch and offers live music during the same time period as the farmers market, that there may be a conflict that would impact my business…

There were food vendors (from out of area and from out of state) as well as live music. And to add insult to injury, some people who buy food from the vendors end up sitting at our outdoor tables -- which are set up for OUR customers -- and many come inside to use our restroom facilities. Farmers market vendors with trucks/vans and patrons also fill the parking lot. For all these reasons, the farmers market has been hurting our business when it is in operation on Sundays. We rely on a large portion of our food sales and revenue on Saturday and Sunday…

For the reasons outlined above, I would ask the Council and the City of Beacon to reconsider renewing the permit on Veterans Place and consider an alternative location. Thank you.
(click here to read the full letter)

 

After the idea of moving the market from Veterans Place to the DMV parking lot was discussed at a City Council Workshop on March 25, 2019, at least 156 people as well as several surrounding businesses signed a petition in support of the Farmers Market staying put at Veterans Place.

Said Stacey Penlon, owner of Beacon Pantry, located nearly across the street from the market: “As a Main Street business owner and direct neighbor of the Market, I have seen that a thriving farmers market in the center of Beacon has been a great asset to the city and its businesses. Its proximity to the Farmers Market as well as my own business has served as a great hub of activity for the middle of Main Street, which has struggled to keep pace with our east and west ends. The Farmers Market and Beacon Pantry form a reciprocal relationship promoting great food and local commerce.”

Nearby Businesses In Support of Veterans Place Location

Pictured below are businesses who wrote in support of the Farmers Market staying put, citing that the market has helped their area of town have more activity. It should be noted that each business serves food. From left: Beacon Pantry (serves meals and sells pantry items), More Good (sells syrups, teas, and sometimes has a vendor table at the market in addition to their storefront), and Beacon Natural Market (sells produce, some prepared food, groceries).

Brainstorming The Move Of The Market - Take It To Workshop!

On March 25, 2019, the City Council held a Workshop meeting about what to do with the Farmers Market, based on Phil’s concerns, which you can listen to during his presentation during a Workshop on April 29, 2019. Ideas were debated by the City Council on what to do with the Farmers Market, with the one-sided consensus being that the Farmers Market would move to the DMV parking lot in one month. Representatives from the Farmers Market did not agree.

The funny thing about Workshop meetings is, they aren’t binding. They are brainstorming sessions to discuss items officially put on their Agenda to discuss. The next step after a Workshop is to have a “Resolution” about what was just discussed, which is when the members of the City Council and the Mayor vote Yay or Nay on that Resolution (aka, the decision they marched toward during the Workshop).

After the Workshop is held, the Resolution is put onto an “Agenda” for the next City Council meeting, where it is usually read out loud by the City Attorney. The council members might bite through a couple points, but if nothing changes, they vote how they are going to vote.

However, these votes can sometimes swing in an unexpected direction, like we saw with the Airbnb vote, where the council members were marching toward legalizing Airbnb-type short-term rentals after having gone through many drafts of writing the law. During the vote, they split, and did not all vote in favor of the law they had been writing, essentially tabling regulation of Airbnb-type short-term rentals.

Proposal And A Possible Vote

This part is key, because at the next non-binding Workshop on April 29, 2019, just days away from the May 5 opening of the 2019 season of the Farmers Market, no lease agreement had been signed between the Farmers Market at the City of Beacon. The City Council seemed confident that the Farmers Market was moving to the DMV, yet had asked the Farmers Market for a proposal on March 25, 2019, to be presented before a vote.

The Farmers Market team thought that this idea of the move had been floated, but not inked. Pressure was put on the Farmers Market by Councilperson Lee Kyriacou for not knowing that they were moving to the DMV: “I'm sorry, what have you been doing to prepare since you last came?” said Lee. “It seems like you didn't like the message.”

However, all was spelled out by the City Attorney on March 25, after Paloma Wake, the manager of the Farmers Market, asked the Council several clarification questions about the agreement: “Is the proposal synonymous with the agreement?” asked Paloma. The City Attorney answered: “Your proposal leads to the Council then adopting an agreement. The Council needs to get a proposal, then the Council adopts a Resolution for a one-year agreement.”

According to Paloma in a supporting letter submitted after that meeting: “Neither myself nor the Committee understood until Tuesday, April 9, that the City Council and Staff were awaiting a proposal from the Market for our License Agreement or that a vote on April 15 would not be possible. We were evaluating the proposed move and awaiting answers to our questions posed on March 25. Given the short timeline, I hope that you will give this matter your immediate attention and that we will be able to come to a consensus at the next Workshop Meeting on April 29.”

So What Happened At The Second Workshop?

The second Workshop was held on April 29, and more points were discussed about why a move to the DMV in one week would be difficult. Mayor Randy Casale saw no problem in flipping locations, “If we were moving you back to the riverfront, that would be a substantial change. The question is, are we going to have a market, and if so, where it’s going to be… You're running a Farmers Market. You can either open at one location or the other.”

Paloma responded: “Our committee and myself feel that our vendors need more time to adjust to that. And to allow the customers time to adjust to the new location. We found that when we moved [from the waterfront] the last time, we are still getting customers looking for us at the waterfront [3 years ago]. Regardless of how much marketing we do, it still takes time for folks to realize a change has been made. This would be a third year on Veterans Place. ... We are starting to build a real audience in that location.”

Council Member Lee Kyriacou wouldn’t entertain a second discovery session, having thought the first non-binding Workshop had solved it: “We already had this conversation. I haven't heard anything differently. I don't know why we are litigating it. There is $1 million of revenue on Main Street. We have to accommodate them.”

Editor’s Note: We tried fact-checking this revenue number. We cannot find a sales tax number for Beacon yet, and are pursuing different offices for an answer. Under an agreement with Dutchess County, which began in 1989 and has been renewed multiple times, the Cities of Beacon and Poughkeepsie “surrendered their rights of preemption to the Sales Tax,” whereby Beacon’s sales tax is sent to Dutchess County, and a fixed amount is paid to Beacon. Under the latest agreement from 2013-2023, Beacon is paid a fixed rate out of a grand total of $25 million that gets paid to Poughkeepsie, Beacon, and other towns and villages outside of Beacon and Poughkeepsie. In the latest renewal of this agreement, Beacon’s portion is $4,158,686 in total over those years. If “Growth” occurs, then an additional amount is paid to Beacon and Poughkeepsie. The amount is calculated based on the net collections of Sales and Use Tax. After their calculations are done to the formula in that agreement with Dutchess County, “if the difference between the two amounts is positive, then the County shall allocate 18.453% of that difference to the Cities of Poughkeepsie and Beacon and to the area outside the cities on the basis of population set forth in 1262(c) of the Tax Law.” This agreement, signed June 14, 2013, is up for renewal in 2023, and is identified as 13-0193-3/23-F1.

Council Member George Mansfield pointed out in the first Workshop meeting that several of the surrounding businesses did support the Farmers Market in that location: “For the record, there are a lot of letters of support from brick and mortars, including Beacon Natural, who you could argue is a direct competitor, and is in support [of this location].”

The former manager of the Farmers Market, Sarah Simon, then approached the podium to express her take on the move: “At this point, we have 30 vendors and customers who want us to open. Paloma works very hard to make this happen. The fact that there are two buildings [near the DMV] that are actively under construction is a very big deal. I think this move is unfair. As a resident of Beacon, I don't think this is happening in the right way. Five businesses right across the street have written letters of support and that have helped their business. We are being made to move based on one business. I'm not convinced we will resolve other issues.”

Regardless, the council people started proceeding with the move to the DMV by suggesting deadlines. They began negotiating with the Farmers Market about how much time the market had to move. One week? Two weeks, they asked? One month was decided upon, and the meeting began to wrap up. Phil rose from the audience and voiced his objection. As Council Member Terry Nelson packed his bags, he replied: “Phil. You won.”

The final vote was set for May 6, 2019.

At The Final Vote - Does The Farmers Market Stay Or Move?

In between the time of the second Workshop and the final vote at the May 6, 2019, City Council meeting, many Beaconites wrote into their council representatives. Each council person ended up wanting to keep the Farmers Market at Veterans Place, after hearing feedback from their constituents.

Amber Grant: “After hearing from people and ... I think we keep them at Veterans Place.”

John Rembert: “At least for this year, until we re-evaluate it.”

George Mansfield: “I’m leaning in that direction. I'm not confident that the problems we are trying to solve won't repeat themselves in another location. In addition to involving the County. And I think the timing is a little bit off. This should have been started early in the winter, long before it got to this point. I think the DMV lot has potential. I'd like to see it after the other buildings are built, to see what kind of congestion we will see.”

Terry Nelson: “I received a lot of feedback too. I agree with George to revisit it earlier. … I’m inclined to stay at Veterans Place.”

Jodi McCredo: “I feel like we needed more time to have this conversation. … I feel like now we’re being pressured to make this decision and there are just so many variables and so many things up in the air. I don’t feel comfortable with this. It would make sense to keep them at Veterans Place and have a date to know when we are going to discuss this for next year.”

Lee Kyriacou, who is running for mayor against current Mayor Randy Casale, was absent for this vote. Council Members who were there voted to keep the Farmers Market at Veterans Place for one more year, and Mayor Casale voted against.

When the Council Members went to cast their votes, a woman from the back of the public audience area called out a question, stating that she thought the issue had been settled, and asked for clarification, pointing out that the business owner leading this issue was not in attendance at the meeting. The Mayor responded: “There’s no settled issue until the Council votes on it in a Council Meeting. We discussed it at the Workshop, and they were going to move them. There is no set agreement until we vote on it at a Council meeting. That’s the way everything happens.”

RESULT:

The Farmers Market will be at Veterans Place again this year. Nothing changed. For 2019. Mark your calendar for November 2019, when the negotiating parties said they wanted to revisit to discuss future placement.

Early Questions Circling DMV vs Veterans Place Location

As the Farmers Market and the City Council began to debate the logistics, a few issues emerged:

  • Hot Summer Heat On An Open Parking Lot: The Farmers Market folks were concerned about the direct heat wilting the produce if in the DMV parking lot. Veterans Place does offer shade, they said. If you speak to the vendors of the Beacon Flea located behind the Post Office, they will tell you about the parking lot heat.

  • DMV Parking Lot Currently Unused, But Is It Because Of No Sign? Jessica Reisman, owner of Homespun Foods, attended the meeting, and spoke at the end. She questioned the presumed emptiness of the parking lot, presenting the idea that no one knows it is a free parking lot. The Mayor objected, saying that he makes announcements during these City Council meetings. Knowing that the parking lot issue is not clear to everyone, A Little Beacon Blog years ago created a Free Parking Lot Guide, and we have received compliments on it by readers who found it online. But in truth, people passing through Beacon who have never watched a City Council meeting would not look at the DMV parking lot as a free lot - unless it had big, friendly signage. Which it currently does not. It has a faded, broken DMV sign, which is a sign to present the names of what is inside of the building, not a parking sign (see picture below). According to Mayor Casale, the parking lot is waiting for a sign from Dutchess County, who owns the lot. There is a nice “Welcome to Beacon” sign, however.

  • Will The DMV Parking Lot Heavily Be In Use After Two New Buildings Open? Buildings next to and across from the DMV parking lot are going up, and are set to open with apartments. How will the free DMV parking lot be impacted when the buildings fill with residents?

  • Good Faith Effort To Accommodate Business Neighbors: Relations between businesses are just as important as between residents in their homes and apartments. After the final voting meeting, Jessica from Homespun suggested that the Farmers Market offer picnic tables to its customers, as well as port-a-potties to help keep unwanted overflow foot traffic out of the Towne Crier Cafe.

  • [EDIT: 5/13/2019] Port-a-Potties Already At Both Markets: What was not discussed at either workshop or the final voting period was that each market has had a port-a-potty at their market, for a total of 2 port-a-potties. The Beacon Flea has a port-a-potty at its market behind the gas station. That was how 2018 went, and how it was proposed that 2019 go. However, the proposal that the Farmers Market put forth was not published onto the City of Beacon’s website on the Agenda page that contains supporting documents (like letters, draft legal documents, etc.). Otherwise, we would have reviewed it for this article and could have seen that port-a-potties were already included in the 2019 year.
    PS: The only reason we know about the port-a-potties is because after the original publishing of this article, a new business in town reached out to us because they wanted the bathroom foot traffic, and saw a port-a-potty as a marketing opportunity. So we unintentionally learned a little bit more about the bathroom situation.

Pictured below is the current signage at the DMV parking lot:


Side Note: Beacon Becoming Not Vendor-Friendly

Vendors are a dicey topic among some brick-and-mortar businesses. Storefront businesses have high stakes once they sign long-term leases. When they see a competing business outside their doors, set up on a street corner as part of a street fair, some of them get upset. On the other hand, you have businesses that join in the fray. Like More Good, who has operated a Main Street storefront for a number of years, while employing people to set up shop at markets all over the state of New York, including at this Farmers Market even though his storefront is just steps away. When we spoke with More Good’s owner, Jason Schuler, three years ago about this, he said business was good at his Farmers Market stand, and at his store. More Good is also also expanding into a larger manufacturing facility in the former IBM Complex in East Fishkill, in addition to their storefront.

La Mère Clothing and Goods, a new brick-and-mortar storefront here in Beacon, has also created a petite La Mère on wheels, where she takes her boutique on the road and attends markets as a vendor. In addition to her storefront space.

All You Knead Artisan Bakery is another Beacon business who has a storefront on Main Street, and attends markets, including Beacon Farmers Market. If you want one of their chocolate croissants, you have two chances to pick one up.

Hudson Valley Seafood is a vendor at the Farmers Market, and is slated to go into the new Food Hall that is coming soon-ish to Main Street (look, they have an Instagram!). Hudson Valley Seafood says they will be open seven days in their new brick-and-mortar location - rather - they will be one of several vendors in a permanent indoor location.

Barb’s Butchery is going to open a vendor spot this year (starting May 19) at the Farmers Market so that people can grab her street food for a quick bite, then go to her shop on Spring Street to re-stock on the chicken, pork, lamb and beef to take home.

In the Farmers Market contract with the City of Beacon are lines about not allowing food vendors to cook at the market, with the exception of Nana’s Homemade to be grandfathered in. (Nana’s serves kabobs, brownies, baklava, hummus, and a few other items). The businesses who have vocalized displeasure with Nana’s are Kamel Jamal of Tito Santana’s, Ziatun and Beacon Bread Company, as well as Phil from Towne Crier Cafe.

As for Towne Crier, they offer a very large menu (yay, so many options), usually have at least 10 different desserts, and have booth seating inside for large families or groups of friends. As for Ziatun, they have my favorite hummus in town. Bar none. Double order required. And as for Beacon Bread, they have some of the best french toast in town (rivaled by Homespun’s deep dish version).

Ziatun and Towne Crier Cafe are sit-down eating experiences. Market eating is street food, or quick food you eat to get you through the rest of Main Street, when you might revisit Towne Crier or Ziatun for a sit-down dinner. Or you snacked at the market, and still sat down at a restaurant 45 minutes later for lunch with a glass of wine or a beer.

The Mayor stated during the May 6, 2019, City Council meeting that he also does not like outside food vendors: “I'm a firm believer that we should not have outside prepared food vendors to non-Beacon brick and mortars.” Can local government dictate how and when we eat?

As for customers - loads of customers line up and wait each Sunday to have their favorite dish from Nana’s. It’s street food. As long as we’re all being honest here, it’s their chicken kabob wrap that gets me out of the house - at all - on Sundays. And it doesn’t even exist on their menu. I have to special request it. If I’m really going to treat myself, Nana’s also has one of the best brownies.

Eating prepared food at a farmers market is a quick bite you get because you know you are not going to go inside to sit at a restaurant. No matter what. You weren’t going to go to a restaurant anyway. Or, those restaurants, especially Ziatun and Beacon Bread, were already full.

Furthermore, not all Beacon-based brick and mortar food businesses can afford to hire more staff to go cook on-site. So they pass on opportunities to do so. This has happened for the Beacon Barkery Parade and others, where business owners have let me know that they can’t sustain to be out of their storefronts and pay additional staff, and order additional food to prepare. On the other hand, other restaurants in Beacon have figured out how to make this happen and do participate in markets.

Proposed Legislation To Block Prepared Food Vendors At Farmers Market

Here is the proposed contract language for 2019 from the City of Beacon to the Farmers Market, regarding prepared food vendors. The council ended up going with their existing 2018 contract for this year, however, this is what was proposed for this year:

 

CGF [Common Ground Farm] shall permit its vendors to sell only those products that are pre-approved by CGF, or its designee. No prepared food vendors may be added to the Market without first right of refusal being given to any Beacon business selling a comparable product. Except that the following vendors may continue to cook or prepare food to serve to the public for the term of their Vendor Agreement: Nana’s Homemade. If these vendors are removed from the Farmers Market, they must be replaced with local businesses.

Prohibited Sales From Vehicles on Veterans Place. There shall be no sales from the surfaces of pick-up trucks, trailers or other vehicles, except that produce and/or fish may be sold from a refrigerated vehicle. All products not exempt herein must be sold from a stationary stall when the Market operates on Veterans Place.

 

Kamel Jamal has long advocated against trucks and vendor opportunities, by doing so on social media and with past events including the market and a one-time Beacon Jazz Festival several years ago, where his food truck was the only one allowed to vend at that privately-run festival. He has signed leases on multiple restaurant locations in Beacon including Tito’s Santanas, Beacon Bread Company, Ziatun, Végétalien, an attempted move or expansion of Ziatun to the former Trendy Tots space on Main Street which is no longer happening (both the storefront and warehouse are still available for rent), as well as an attempted purchase of Poppy’s hamburger joint, which was purchased instead by the owners of Kitchen Sink. That burger joint is now Meyer’s Olde Dutch.

Business competition is a very tricky thing and has no single variable as to why a business is succeeding or not. To allow a government to begin legislation between business competitors can spread to other types of businesses, including soaps, coffee shops, jewelry (both wholesale in store and brick-and-mortar locations of a sole designer), and any other business type.

Additionally, a “local business” as mentioned in that proposed contract language is hard to define. Since Nana’s is a local business - somewhere - in some local area. Is a “local business” defined as one that is local anywhere? If the business has a brick and mortar in Beacon, but the owner lives in Poughkeepsie or Hopewell Junction or Wappingers Falls or Cold Spring, is that a “local business” as defined by the contract language introduced above? Because several Main Street business owners fall into that category, where they have a brick and mortar in Beacon, but live in a different city or town.

It should be noted for consideration, that Food Trucks were approved into Zoning in the “Linkage District” aka down near Brett’s Hardware, in January 2018. Additionally, a very popular food truck called the Beacon Bite, which ran on an empty lot next to Ella’s Bellas, powered down years ago. We were not covering City Council meetings at that time, but variables were discussed at the time about that food truck-based business.

Side Side Note: Community Around Farmers Markets - How It Happens

Gathering people in this way - street food eating - is part of the Farmers Market’s mission, as was stated several times in the Workshop meetings by the market manager. In response to Council Member Lee Kyriacou’s challenging of the issue the Farmers Market - when he asked if it was a mission issue or a neighbor issue: “Doesn't sound like there is any conflict with your core mission. Your core mission is about a farmers market. It's the ancillary components - the prepared food and the music. I think that if those are limited, I think you’ll have a ton of support. If there are more of those other things, I think that will create conflict.”

Paloma answered to define what a farmers market is and what it means to people: “I think we view the function of a Farmers Market ... to be a public space and to be a public gathering space. I think the prepared food and the music tie into that core aspect of it.”

Side Side Side Note: Does The City Of Beacon Want To Legislate Business Competition?

What was not discussed were the other businesses - artists and makers who provide items that are not food - that are not being legislated out - yet. Activities or products for children, home decor, wine tastings, books, etc. All of these items are available on Main Street just as restaurants are. It should be asked: If the City of Beacon legislates out competing businesses who put stakes down into brick-and-mortar locations, do they also plan to begin legislating out businesses at the vendor level?

If there are five yoga studios in Beacon, or three Pilates studios, or six coffee shops or three locations for different soaps, would the City start legislating that? Why just restaurants? And should the City have a hand in a business - if a business wants to sign a lease in a location which is zoned for what it provides - asking permission to open at all if there are competing businesses in town?

It’s a running - very endearing - observation that there are so many coffee shops in town. Everyone loves them all, as each is their own creation. But can you imagine if the City of Beacon didn’t allow one of them to open because there were already a few established? The coffee shops have their customers who like their vibe, their coffee, their music, their seating, their decor, their people. Fear of competition usually dissipates because people visit more than one of their favorites. Personally, I shop from and get produce from four grocery sources: Key Food, Beacon Natural, the Farmers Market, and Peapod. And Barb’s for my beef and chicken. It’s fun. Why regulate these choices?

Businesses in other cities in other states also do fight these vendor and food truck options. And City Councils do listen to them. Despite the enormous amount of people and customers (taxpayers creating the revenue that is sent in from the restaurant) who support all of these establishments, and value the vibrancy and choice it gives to a city. These street events are certainly part of the charm of Beacon.

So, set a note on your calendar for November 2019 for when this comes up again. Meanwhile, see you at market.