New Burger Joint To Open In Old Burger Joint - Meyer’s Olde Dutch Replaces Poppy's

 The Poppy's sign has come down, but the space at 184 Main Street known for farm-to-table burgers will open soon under new ownership. fear not: Beacon will keep its burger joint!

The Poppy's sign has come down, but the space at 184 Main Street known for farm-to-table burgers will open soon under new ownership. fear not: Beacon will keep its burger joint!

Days after the ink dried on the closing papers for the one-story building that until last week was home to Poppy's Burgers and Fries and owned by its founder Paul Yeaple, a press release went out announcing that the building's new owner - Brian Arnoff, owner and chef at Kitchen Sink just across and down the street - would be opening a second restaurant on Main Street. Meyer’s Olde Dutch, "a casual, modern interpretation of the classic burger joint," is slated to open in May 2017 in the 184 Main Street location.

Making use of the bar that Poppy's had installed during its last round of renovations, Meyer's Olde Dutch will run a full-service bar, serving a large selection of New York craft beer, locally produced wine, and house-crafted cocktails. Kitchen Sink is known for its selection of New York-made wine. They are also known for locally sourced beef, cheese, and local produce, which will make its way into the new burger joint. Kitchen Sink, followed by Meyer's Olde Dutch, has taken farm-to-table to a new level: The Arnoff family owns a micro farm, Truckload Farm and Orchard in Hyde Park, which supplies some of the ingredients to Kitchen Sink. In addition to classic beef patties, Meyer's Olde Dutch will offer lamb, chicken and vegan options with plenty of toppings and house-made signature sauces, plus hand-cut fries, sweet potato fritters and salads.

The Ultimate Farm-To-Table Burger Joint

The burger joint that had planted a flag at this location wasn't just any burger joint. Poppy's owner, Beacon native Paul Yeaple, was a Beacon pioneer of the farm-to-table ethos. When speaking to Southwest Dutchess, Paul reflected: "When I started Poppy's eight years ago, there was no local food anywhere in Beacon. Now it's abundant. Maybe we can go to another town and help incubate a better food situation for them too." Paul certainly has left his mark for farm-to-table, as Meyer's Olde Dutch will be dressing the burgers with produce from their very own farms. That kind of farm-to-table match is rare. For more on Paul's thinking about why he closed Poppy's, see Brian PJ Cronin's article in the Highlands Current.

About Meyer's Olde Dutch

Meyer's Olde Dutch is named after Brian's great-grandfather Meyer, who once owned and operated Olde Dutch Grocery, across the river in Middletown, NY. With the new place, Brian says, “We look forward to bringing the same passion for food that we’ve provided across the street in our fine dining establishment, but in a more casual atmosphere.” The atmosphere at Kitchen Sink is already quite casual - a classy casual - with a seriously impressive menu that changes with the seasons and with what's been harvested, presented in a way that is a work of art. We can't wait to see what casual looks like at Meyer's Olde Dutch.

Arnoff's goal is to be open by Saturday, April 29, 2017, the day Beacon Barks parades down the street on the West End of town. Take-out is slated to be available from a side-door location down the alley between buildings. If you're excited about the side-door take-out as a new perk of the burger joint experience, just wait to hear what else Brian has in store. Anyone who has had the grilled cheese or mac and cheese from Kitchen Sink knows that there is something spectacular about those oozy, creamy dishes. After years of culinary training and apprenticing, including a stint in Italy where he "developed a deeper appreciation for seasonal ingredients and regional cooking," Brian opened a mac and cheese food truck. CapMac was one of the first food trucks on the DC mobile dining scene. Brian sold the truck three years later, before moving back to the Hudson Valley to literally and figuratively put down roots.

 Pictured: Brian Arnoff, owner of Kitchen Sink, the new Meyer's Olde Dutch, and of the 184 Main Street building.

Pictured: Brian Arnoff, owner of Kitchen Sink, the new Meyer's Olde Dutch, and of the 184 Main Street building.